Watch the 2023 National Book Awards Teen Press Conference

The National Book Awards Teen Press Conference brings the excitement of the most prestigious literary award in the US to middle and high school students in New York City, and across the country. Held during National Book Awards Week, Teen Press Conference invites school groups to attend a free literary event that is curated just for them.

Tuesday November 14th, 2023
Livestream: 10:30am-11:30am EST

Author photo of Dhonielle Clayton. (Photo credit: Jess Andree)
Dhonielle Clayton. (Photo credit: Jess Andree)

HOSTED BY: 

Dhonielle Clayton is a New York Times bestselling author of The Conjureverse series, The Belles series, Shattered Midnight, co-author of Blackout, Whiteout, The Rumor Game, and of the Tiny Pretty Things duology, a Netflix original series. She hails from the Washington, D.C. suburbs on the Maryland side. She taught secondary school for several years, and is a former elementary and middle school librarian. She is COO of the non-profit We Need Diverse Books. She is the President and founder of Cake Creative and Electric Postcard Entertainment, IP story companies creating diverse books for all ages. She’s an avid traveller, and always on the hunt for magic and mischief.


 

FEATURING:

Kenneth M. Cadow, Gather
Candlewick Press

Huda Fahmy, Huda F Cares?
Dial Books for Young Readers / Penguin Random House

Vashti Harrison, Big
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers / Hachette Book Group

Katherine Marsh, The Lost Year: A Survival Story of the Ukrainian Famine
Roaring Brook Press / Macmillan Publishers

Dan Santat, A First Time for Everything
First Second / Macmillan Publishers


If you have any questions, please email NBF Education Manager Julianna Lee Marino at jleemarino@nationalbook.org.

Teen Press Conference is supported, in part, by The National Endowment for the Arts, The New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature, and public funds from New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.


LeVar Burton, Actor and Education Advocate, to Host 74th National Book Awards Ceremony & Benefit Dinner

The National Book Foundation, presenter of the National Book Awards, today announced LeVar Burton, renowned actor, director, and author, will host the 74th National Book Awards Ceremony & Benefit Dinner on November 15, 2023 at Cipriani Wall Street in New York City.

“LeVar Burton has introduced multiple generations of young people to the joys of reading, and is a fearless advocate for book access, especially amidst the alarming rise in book banning across the country,” said David Steinberger, Chair of the Board of Directors of the National Book Foundation. “We are delighted to welcome LeVar back onto the National Book Awards stage, alongside special guest Oprah Winfrey, to champion the power of literature as the host this year’s Ceremony & Benefit Dinner.”

“I’m a big believer in the power of the written word, and am proud to stand alongside the National Book Foundation to celebrate exceptional storytelling and the Foundation’s mission to make books accessible to everyone, everywhere,” said LeVar Burton. “It’s an honor to return as host of the biggest night for books, especially in a moment when the freedom to read is at risk and literature both needs and deserves our recognition and support.”

Actor, director, producer, writer, and podcaster LeVar Burton is recognized globally for his role as Chief Engineer Geordi La Forge in the iconic Star Trek: The Next Generation television and film series; his breakout role as Kunta Kinte in the ABC miniseries Roots; and as the host and executive producer of the PBS children’s television series, Reading Rainbow. Burton continues to inspire new generations of readers with his podcast, LeVar Burton Reads, in which he reads and discusses a work of short fiction in every episode. He is also the award-winning author of Aftermath, The Rhino Who Swallowed a Storm, and A Kids Book About Imagination. In 2019, Burton hosted the 70th National Book Awards Ceremony & Benefit Dinner. Most recently, Burton served as the Honorary Chair of Banned Books Week 2023, an annual week-long series of events that draws attention to the rising movement of book censorship in the United States and highlights the importance of free and open access to information for readers of all ages. The National Book Foundation is a Banned Books Week coalition member.

“We are honored to have LeVar Burton—a longtime friend and ally of the National Book Foundation—join us to celebrate the power of stories,” said Ruth Dickey, Executive Director of the National Book Foundation. “From his role as the beloved host of Reading Rainbow to his new documentary The Right to Read, Burton’s unique and contagious passion for books has inspired countless readers. This year—more than ever before—books are at risk, and we are tremendously proud to have a champion like Burton celebrate authors, translators, and readers everywhere as the host of the 2023 National Book Awards.”

The National Book Award Winners in the categories of Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Translated Literature, and Young People’s Literature will be announced live on Wednesday, November 15. The five Finalists in each category were selected by a distinguished panel of judges, and were announced earlier this month by the New York Times. The invitation-only 74th National Book Awards Ceremony & Benefit Dinner, featuring special guest Oprah Winfrey, will also include the presentation of two lifetime achievement awards. Rita Dove, National Book Award Finalist and Pulitzer Prize winning poet, will be recognized with the National Book Foundation’s Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, presented by National Book Award Finalist Jericho Brown, and Paul Yamazaki, principal buyer at City Lights Booksellers & Publishers, will receive the Foundation’s Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community, presented by Books & Books owner Mitchell Kaplan. Readers everywhere can register for the National Book Awards Ceremony broadcast at nationalbook.org/awards.

In addition to announcing the National Book Award Winners, the Benefit Dinner drives funding for the Foundation’s year-round educational and public programming to connect readers of all ages, in every corner of the country, with books and authors. For more information about the 74th National Book Awards Ceremony & Benefit Dinner, including sponsorship opportunities, please visit the National Book Foundation website.

ABOUT LEVAR BURTON:

LeVar Burton is an actor, director, producer, and podcaster whose decades-long body of work includes Roots, Star Trek: The Next Generation, and Reading Rainbow. He is the honored recipient of seven NAACP Awards, a Peabody Award, a Grammy Award, and 15 Emmy Awards, including a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Inaugural Children’s & Family Emmys.

As a lifelong literacy advocate, Burton has dedicated decades to encouraging children to read. In 2023, Burton premiered his first documentary, The Right to Read, a film that positions the literacy crisis in America as a civil rights issue. The Right to Read was an official selection at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival and SXSW EDU.

Burton continues to exercise his passion for storytelling as the award-winning author of Aftermath, The Rhino Who Swallowed a Storm, and A Kids Book About Imagination. He launched his first book club with Fable, a digital book club community, and partnered with Masterclass, to share the power of storytelling.

His production company, LeVar Burton Entertainment (LBE), develops projects in the film, television, podcasting, and publishing space with the mission to share stories that fosters empathy, champions diversity, and builds community.

Now in its 12th season, the enormously popular LeVar Burton Reads podcast has over 175 episodes in its catalog, boasting 25 million downloads. LBE’s first Kids & Family podcast, Sound Detectives, will debut on Stitcher in July of 2023.

As a pop culture icon, Burton has the unique ability to reach across all ages, ethnicities, and socioeconomic groups–communicating to a large fan base that is highly engaged and motivated to embrace his message.

Image: LeVar Burton. (Photo credit: Sarah Coulter for Paramount+)

 

2023 National Book Awards Finalists Announced

Twenty-five Finalists to contend for National Book Awards in the categories of Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Translated Literature, and Young People’s Literature


The 25 Finalists for the 2023 National Book Awards for Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Translated Literature, and Young People’s Literature were announced with the New York Times. The five Finalists in each category were selected by a distinguished panel of judges, and were advanced from the Longlists announced in September with The New Yorker.

Between the five categories, there are four writers and one translator who have been previously honored by the National Book Foundation: Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah was a 2018 5 Under 35 honoree; Pilar Quintana and Lisa Dillman were Finalists for Translated Literature in 2020; Justin Torres was a 2012 5 Under 35 honoree; and Monica Youn was a Finalist for Poetry in 2010 and a Longlister for Poetry in 2016. All of the Finalists in the categories of Nonfiction and Young People’s Literature are first-time National Book Award honorees. Three of the 25 Finalists are debuts, and 11 independent, nonprofit, and university publishers are represented.

The 2023 Finalists will read from their work at the annual National Book Awards Finalist Reading, hosted by writer and comedian Amber Ruffin, on the evening of Tuesday, November 14 at NYU Skirball. The Finalist Reading is presented in partnership with the National Book Foundation and the NYU Creative Writing Program, and tickets are available for purchase on NYU Skirball’s website. On the morning of November 14, the annual National Book Awards Teen Press Conference for middle and high school students, featuring the Finalists in the category of Young People’s Literature, will be hosted by author Dhonielle Clayton. Both events will be in-person and livestreamed, and more information on all upcoming National Book Foundation events is available at the Foundation’s website.

The Winners will be announced live on Wednesday, November 15 at the invitation-only 74th National Book Awards Ceremony & Benefit Dinner, featuring special guest Oprah Winfrey, at Cipriani Wall Street in New York City. The National Book Foundation will broadcast the Ceremony for readers everywhere on YouTube, Facebook, and the Foundation’s website at nationalbook.org/awards. Winners of the National Book Awards receive $10,000, a bronze medal, and statue; Finalists receive $1,000 and a bronze medal; Winners and Finalists in the Translated Literature category will split the prize evenly between author and translator. Two lifetime achievement awards will also be presented as part of the evening’s ceremony: Rita Dove, National Book Award Finalist and Pulitzer Prize winning poet, will be recognized with the National Book Foundation’s Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, presented by Jericho Brown, and Paul Yamazaki, principal buyer at City Lights Booksellers & Publishers, will receive the Foundation’s Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community, presented by Mitchell Kaplan.

Publishers submitted a total of 1,931 books for this year’s National Book Awards: 496 in Fiction, 638 in Nonfiction, 295 in Poetry, 154 in Translated Literature, and 348 in Young People’s Literature. Judges’ decisions are made independently of the National Book Foundation staff and Board of Directors, and deliberations are strictly confidential.

Finalists for Fiction:

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, Chain-Gang All-Stars
Pantheon Books / Penguin Random House

Aaliyah Bilal, Temple Folk
Simon & Schuster

Paul Harding, This Other Eden
W. W. Norton & Company

Hanna Pylväinen, The End of Drum-Time
Henry Holt and Company / Macmillan Publishers

Justin Torres, Blackouts
Farrar, Straus and Giroux / Macmillan Publishers

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah’s dystopian novel Chain-Gang All-Stars simulates a private for-profit prison system where prisoners compete for freedom in live-broadcast gladiator-inspired death matches. Aaliyah Bilal’s debut short story collection, Temple Folk, examines the diversity of the Black Muslim experience in America. Paul Harding’s novel This Other Eden traces the legacy of a mixed-race fishing community living on a secluded island off the coast of Maine from 1792 to the early 20th century. In Hanna Pylväinen’s The End of Drum-Time, a Lutheran minister’s daughter falls in love with a native Sámi reindeer herder and joins the herders on their annual migration to the sea in 1850s Scandinavia. Justin Torres’s Blackouts considers the multigenerational gaps in personal and collective queer histories through the real-life inspiration of Sex Variants: A Study of Homosexual Patterns.

Finalists for Nonfiction:

Ned Blackhawk, The Rediscovery of America: Native Peoples and the Unmaking of U.S. History
Yale University Press

Cristina Rivera Garza, Liliana’s Invincible Summer: A Sister’s Search for Justice
Hogarth / Penguin Random House

Christina Sharpe, Ordinary Notes
Farrar, Straus and Giroux / Macmillan Publishers

Raja Shehadeh, We Could Have Been Friends, My Father and I: A Palestinian Memoir
Other Press

John Vaillant, Fire Weather: A True Story from a Hotter World
Knopf / Penguin Random House

Historian Ned Blackhawk’s The Rediscovery of America: Native Peoples and the Unmaking of U.S. History recontextualizes five centuries of US, Native, and non-native histories to argue that Indigenous peoples have played—and continue to play—an essential role in the development of American democracy. In Liliana’s Invincible Summer: A Sister’s Search for Justice, Cristina Rivera Garza travels to Mexico City to recover her sister’s unresolved case file nearly 30 years after her murder, simultaneously honoring her sister’s life and examining how violence against women affects everyone. Across 248 notes, Christina Sharpe’s Ordinary Notes investigates the legacy of white supremacy and slavery, and presents a kaleidoscopic narrative that celebrates the Black American experience. In We Could Have Been Friends, My Father and I: A Palestinian Memoir, attorney and activist Raja Shehadeh explores his complicated relationship with his father—a lawyer and Palestinian human rights activist who was assassinated in 1985— alongside histories of oppression. In Fire Weather: A True Story from a Hotter World, journalist John Vaillant studies the May 2016 wildfire that devastated a small city in central Canada to make the case that the catastrophic Fort McMurray fire was a foreboding window into what the future holds.

Finalists for Poetry:

John Lee Clark, How to Communicate
W. W. Norton & Company

Craig Santos Perez, from unincorporated territory [åmot]
Omnidawn Publishing

Evie Shockley, suddenly we
Wesleyan University Press

Brandon Som, Tripas
Georgia Review Books / University of Georgia Press

Monica Youn, From From
Graywolf Press

John Lee Clark’s How to Communicate considers the small joys and pains of life, and the endless possibilities of language through poems influenced by the Braille slate and translated from American Sign Language and Protactile, a language used by DeafBlind people that’s rooted in touch. Craig Santos Perez observes and asserts storytelling as an act of resistance—a written form of “åmot,” the Chamoru word for “medicine”—in from unincorporated territory [åmot], the fifth installment in his series dedicated to his homeland of Guåhan (Guam). Evie Shockley plays with visuals, sounds, and poetic form to pay homage to Black feminist visionaries, both living and departed, of a collective “we” in suddenly we. Tripas celebrates Brandon Som’s upbringing in a multicultural, multigenerational home, traversing languages, cultures, and borders to connect his family’s histories. Through poetry and personal essays, Monica Youn’s From From confronts American racism and anti-Asian violence, and reflects back the question of “where are you from from” onto its readers.

Finalists for Translated Literature:

Bora Chung, Cursed Bunny
Translated from the Korean by Anton Hur
Algonquin Books / Hachette Book Group

David Diop, Beyond the Door of No Return
Translated from the French by Sam Taylor
Farrar, Straus and Giroux / Macmillan Publishers

Stênio Gardel, The Words That Remain
Translated from the Portuguese by Bruna Dantas Lobato
New Vessel Press

Pilar Quintana, Abyss
Translated from the Spanish by Lisa Dillman
World Editions

Astrid Roemer, On a Woman’s Madness
Translated from the Dutch by Lucy Scott
Two Lines Press

Translated from the Korean by Anton Hur, the ten stories in Bora Chung’s Cursed Bunny dive headfirst into the surreal to tackle the very real horrors of big tech, capitalism, and the patriarchy. Beyond the Door of No Return by David Diop and translated from the French by Sam Taylor, contemplates the brutality of French colonial occupation and the consequences of obsession, love, and betrayal in 18th-century West Africa. In his seventies, a man is finally able to read a letter from his childhood lover in The Words That Remain by Stênio Gardel, a debut novel translated from the Portuguese by Bruna Dantas Lobato that explores queerness, violence, and the transformative power of the written word. Abyss by Pilar Quintana and translated from the Spanish by Lisa Dillman, follows an 8-year-old narrator as she makes sense of the world by observing the adults around her, perceiving the complexities of family life at once as real and fantastical. In Astrid Roemer’s On A Woman’s Madness, translated from the Dutch by Lucy Scott, a queer Black woman escapes her abusive husband in search of a new, freer life beyond society’s expectations.

Finalists for Young People’s Literature:

Kenneth M. Cadow, Gather
Candlewick Press

Huda Fahmy, Huda F Cares?
Dial Books for Young Readers / Penguin Random House

Vashti Harrison, Big
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers / Hachette Book Group

Katherine Marsh, The Lost Year: A Survival Story of the Ukrainian Famine
Roaring Brook Press / Macmillan Publishers

Dan Santat, A First Time for Everything
First Second / Macmillan Publishers

In Gather, Kenneth M. Cadow’s debut novel, a teenager fights to maintain his family’s home, find a job, and care for his mother as she recovers from her opioid addiction—all the while adopting Gather, a stray dog. Huda F Cares?, a graphic novel written and illustrated by Huda Fahmy, follows a visibly Muslim family on their road trip to Disney World, and tells a story of self-acceptance, faith, and the joys and embarrassments of sisterhood. Big, a picture book written and illustrated by Vashti Harrison, is the story of a little girl with a big heart and big dreams who learns that “big” doesn’t always have a positive connotation and offers readers of all ages an important reminder that words matter. The Lost Year by Katherine Marsh follows a 13 year-old who uncovers a family secret tracing back to Holodomor, a government-imposed famine that led to the death of millions of Ukrainians. Dan Santat captures the awkward middle school experience in A First Time for Everything, a graphic memoir inspired by the author’s class trip, and a series of life-changing firsts, in Europe.

Watch Schomburg Center and NBF Presents: Poetics of the Archive

National Book Award Winners Nikky Finney (Head Off & Split, 2011 Poetry Winner) and Robin Coste Lewis (Voyage of the Sable Venus, 2015 Poetry Winner) excavate and reimagine family and historical archives as poetry in their recent books Love Child’s Hotbed of Occasional Poetry and To the Realization of Perfect Helplessness.

The authors join National Book Award Winner Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming, 2014 Young People’s Literature Winner) in conversation on the care of community archival work and the power of Black stories amidst continued book banning.

Presented in partnership with Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. This is an official 2023 Brooklyn Book Festival Bookend event.

2023 National Book Awards Longlist for Fiction

The ten contenders for the National Book Award for Fiction

Find The New Yorker’s announcement here.

The National Book Foundation today announced the Longlist for the 2023 National Book Award for Fiction. The Finalists in all five categories will be revealed on Tuesday, October 3.

The 2023 Fiction Longlist includes authors at all stages of their careers, and features a debut novel and a debut short story collection. Three authors on the Fiction Longlist have been previously honored by the National Book Foundation: Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah was a 2018 5 Under 35 honoree; Jayne Anne Phillips was a Finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction in 2009; and Justin Torres was a 2012 5 Under 35 honoree. The Longlisted authors have been recognized by numerous other awards and honors, including the Arts and Letters Award, the Booker Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Pulitzer Prize, the Whiting Award, and many more. Among these ten Longlisters are Cullman Center, Guggenheim, MacDowell, National Endowment for the Arts, and Stegner fellows. Their writing has been featured in A Public Space, Granta, Guernica, The Kenyon Review, McSweeney’s, The New Yorker, The Paris Review, The Rumpus, and elsewhere.

Two titles centering queer characters ask: how do the stories we tell to and about ourselves impact our identity, self-understanding, and history itself? An unnamed narrator is tasked with continuing his dying mentor’s life work in Justin TorresBlackouts. The story—inspired by a queer-led research study that was co-opted to pathologize homosexuality—considers the gaps in personal and collective queer history, and how stories have the power to keep people alive. Eliot Duncan’s semiautobiographical coming-of-age story Ponyboy follows its titular character from Paris to Berlin where he grapples with reconciling his trans-masculinity and the expectations of his girlfriend, Baby. As he spirals deeper into substance abuse and eventually overdoses, Ponyboy returns home to Iowa in this exploration of addiction, recovery, and naming oneself.

Two novels consider the interiorities, and subjugation, of Black and Indigenous women. Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah’s dystopian novel Chain-Gang All-Stars simulates a private for-profit prison system where prisoners compete in live-broadcast gladiator-inspired death matches. This novel positions freedom as an impossible prize and offers unflinching commentary on the exploitation of Black women, systemic racism, capitalism, and mass incarceration. Inventively structured, A Council of Dolls is the story of three generations of Native women—Cora, Lillian, and Sissy—told in reverse chronological order with help from the dolls that kept them company from childhood into adulthood. Mona Susan Power illuminates the horrors of Indian boarding schools, the impacts of intergenerational trauma, and the enduring strength that comes from unconditional, ancestral love.

This year’s Longlist includes two titles that study the effects of war within countries and communities. In Tania James’s epic 18th-century tale, Loot, a young woodcarver is commissioned by the sultan to build a life-size, mauling tiger automaton, which is stolen by the British. Spanning decades and ranging from India to Europe, this novel is an interrogation of war and colonialism that asks who has the right to claim ownership over art and history. One hundred years later, across the Atlantic Ocean is Jayne Anne Phillips’s Night Watch, which follows a mother and daughter in post-Civil War West Virginia. Twelve-year-old ConaLee and her mother Eliza are left at an asylum by a war veteran, and the duo become entangled in the facility and the lives of the people who work there—the cook, the doctor, and the peculiar man they call the Night Watch—in this story of endurance, healing, and starting over.

Two titles in this year’s Longlist parse the intersection of power, influence, and subjugation. Inspired by the true story of Malaga Island, Paul Harding’s novel This Other Eden traces the legacy and lineage of the racially integrated fishing community living on a secluded island off the coast of Maine from 1792 to the early 20th century. When a white missionary arrives on the island, the predominately Black and poor community is swiftly displaced from their homes as a result of the rising eugenics movement in this tale of survival and belonging in the face of intolerance. In a different remote village in northern Scandinavia, Hanna Pylväinen’s The End of Drum-Time follows native Sámi residents as they weather a Lutheran minister’s vexatious attempts to convert them—and the wholly unexpected conversion of one of the town’s most esteemed reindeer herders. When the minister’s daughter falls in love with the son of the unlikely convert, she joins the herders on their annual migration to the sea as this intensely researched 19th-century novel weaves together cultural, spiritual, and political divides.

The two short story collections recognized reflect upon the interplay of faith, culture, and community. From a dutiful daughter interrupted by her father’s ghost as she attempts to write his eulogy to a teenager who discovers she never believed in God, the characters in Aaliyah Bilal’s ten stories are forced to reckon with conflicts between religion and independence. In her debut short story collection Temple Folk, Bilal compassionately unfurls the inner lives of her protagonists, examining the complex contradictions of the Black Muslim experience in America. At the heart of LaToya Watkins’s short story collection Holler, Child is yearning, displayed in wives dismissed by their partners, sisters searching for their estranged brother, and a father who becomes overly attached to his dog after his son’s death. Featuring a cast of Black men and women hailing from West Texas, the characters in these eleven stories grapple with grief, secrets, and the realization that you’ll never fully know those you love.

Publishers submitted a total of 496 books for the 2023 National Book Award for Fiction. The judges for Fiction are Steph Cha, Calvin Crosby, Silas House, Mat Johnson (Chair), and Helena María Viramontes. Judges’ decisions are made independently of the National Book Foundation staff and Board of Directors, and deliberations are strictly confidential. Winners in all categories will be announced live at the National Book Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, November 15, 2023.

2023 Longlist for the National Book Award for Fiction:

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, Chain-Gang All-Stars
Pantheon Books / Penguin Random House

Aaliyah Bilal, Temple Folk
Simon & Schuster

Eliot Duncan, Ponyboy
W. W. Norton & Company

Paul Harding, This Other Eden
W. W. Norton & Company

Tania James, Loot
Knopf / Penguin Random House

Jayne Anne Phillips, Night Watch
Knopf / Penguin Random House

Mona Susan Power, A Council of Dolls
Mariner Books / HarperCollins Publishers

Hanna Pylväinen, The End of Drum-Time
Henry Holt and Company / Macmillan Publishers

Justin Torres, Blackouts
Farrar, Straus and Giroux / Macmillan Publishers

LaToya Watkins, Holler, Child
Tiny Reparations Books / Penguin Random House

2023 National Book Awards Longlist for Nonfiction

The ten contenders for the National Book Award for Nonfiction

Find The New Yorker’s announcement here.

The National Book Foundation announced the Longlist for the 2023 National Book Award for Nonfiction. The Finalists in all five categories will be revealed on Tuesday, October 3.

The 2023 Nonfiction Longlist includes emerging and established writers, and features works of memoir, science writing, biographies of both iconic figures and unsung heroes, investigative works that reframe historically significant events, and more. Viet Thanh Nguyen, who was a Finalist for the National Book Award for Nonfiction in 2016, is the sole honoree on the 2023 Nonfiction Longlist who has been previously recognized by the National Book Awards. This year’s Nonfiction Longlist includes two MacArthur Fellows and a Guggenheim Fellow. The Longlisted authors have been previously honored by the Orwell Prize, the Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz Prize, the Windham-Campbell Literature Prize, and the Pulitzer Prize. Their work has appeared in the American Indian Culture and Research Journal, The American Historical Review, The Atlantic, Artforum, Ebony, Essence, GQ, National Geographic, The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, the New York TimesSlate, and The Wall Street Journal, among others.

Two memoirs in this year’s Longlist explore what it means to be a conflicted citizen, and what it means to live through conflict. In his memoir, Viet Thanh Nguyen weaves together an intensely personal reflection of the Vietnamese refugee experience with the history of colonization, war, and anti-Asian racism in the United States. A Man of Two Faces: A Memoir, A History, A Memorial is a complex meditation on Nguyen’s life as a father and a son, and an exploration of the murkiness of memory and necessity of forgiveness. Three decades after his father’s assassination in 1985, attorney and activist Raja Shehadeh tasks himself with reviewing his father’s archives and uncovers legal cases, letters, and other meticulously organized documents that shine a new light on his father’s legacy as a lawyer and Palestinian human rights activist. A simultaneously personal and historically rich memoir, We Could Have Been Friends, My Father and I: A Palestinian Memoir probes the fraught relationship between a father and son, examining the many ways their lives are parallel both despite, and because of, disagreement.

Two titles recognize the profound impact of Indigenous peoples and Black Americans on US history and its necessary context to understand present-day America and how it came to be. Historian Ned Blackhawk recontextualizes five centuries of US, Native, and non-native histories to argue that in the face of extreme violence, land dispossession, and catastrophic epidemics, Indigenous peoples played, and continue to play, an essential role in the development of American democracy. The Rediscovery of America: Native Peoples and the Unmaking of U.S. History brings Native American history to the forefront of the narrative, acknowledging Native communities’ agency, strength, and ongoing efforts to reclaim autonomy. Kidada E. Williams examines the Reconstruction-era South from the perspective of formerly enslaved people as they began to build new lives in defiance of white supremacist violence. I Saw Death Coming: A History of Terror and Survival in the War Against Reconstruction investigates overlooked archival records, employs oral history methods, and includes new scholarship on the impacts of generational trauma to consider the enduring effects of political disenfranchisement, economic inequality, and anti-Black violence.

The 2023 Nonfiction Longlist includes two books authored by journalists that dive deep into the environmental and societal ramifications of human behavior—on one another and on the world around them. Journalist Donovan X. Ramsey explores the crack epidemic of the 1980s and 1990s through four profiles of individuals whose lives were impacted by the crisis. Connecting the civil rights era and war on drugs to today’s conversations about police brutality, gentrification, and mass incarceration, When Crack Was King: A People’s History of a Misunderstood Era argues that the low-income Black and brown communities disproportionately affected should receive the assistance they have been denied for generations. Just over the US border, journalist John Vaillant studies the May 2016 wildfire that devastated a small city in central Canada and its relationship to climate science, fossil fuels, and the unparalleled destruction brought about by modern wildfires in Fire Weather: A True Story from a Hotter World. Ultimately, Vaillant makes the case that the catastrophic Fort McMurray event was not an anomaly, but rather a foreboding window into what the future holds.

Two Longlisted titles analyze individual histories to tell a broader story about American history. King: A Life—the first major biography of Martin Luther King Jr. in decades, and the first to include newly declassified FBI files—offers a comprehensive and nuanced portrait of the civil rights leader as an imperfect man. Jonathan Eig’s lens provides new insights into the King family and wider activist network, while underscoring the relevance of King’s call for equality, freedom, and racial and economic justice today. In The Slip: The New York City Street That Changed American Art Forever, Prudence Peiffer pays homage to six artists who lived and worked on the same street in lower Manhattan during the late 1950s and early 1960s. Peiffer’s touching group biography questions the very idea of a “movement”—tracing the respective careers of this distinctive creative community and their impact on art and film in the late 20th century. 

Two Longlisted titles collect, inspect, and make meaning of documents of the past to imagine new futures. Ordinary Notes gathers personal and public artifacts that cover everything from history, art, photography, and literature, to beauty, memory, and language. Across 248 notes, Christina Sharpe examines the legacy of white supremacy and slavery, crowdsources entries for a “Dictionary of Untranslatable Blackness,” and presents a kaleidoscopic narrative that celebrates the Black American experience. Inspired by global feminist movements, Cristina Rivera Garza travels to Mexico City to recover her sister’s unresolved case file nearly 30 years after she was murdered by an ex-boyfriend. Drawing on police reports, notebooks, handwritten letters, and interviews from those who were closest to her, Rivera Garza preserves her sister’s legacy and examines how violence against women affects everyone, regardless of gender, in Liliana’s Invincible Summer: A Sister’s Search for Justice.

Publishers submitted a total of 638 books for the 2023 National Book Award for Nonfiction. The judges for Nonfiction are Hanif Abdurraqib, Ada Ferrer (Chair), James Fugate, Sarah Schulman, and Sonia Shah. Judges’ decisions are made independently of the National Book Foundation staff and Board of Directors, and deliberations are strictly confidential. Winners in all categories will be announced live at the National Book Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, November 15, 2023.

2023 Longlist for the National Book Award for Nonfiction:

Ned Blackhawk, The Rediscovery of America: Native Peoples and the Unmaking of U.S. History
Yale University Press

Jonathan Eig, King: A Life
Farrar, Straus and Giroux / Macmillan Publishers

Viet Thanh Nguyen, A Man of Two Faces: A Memoir, A History, A Memorial
Grove Press / Grove Atlantic

Prudence Peiffer, The Slip: The New York City Street That Changed American Art Forever
Harper / HarperCollins Publishers

Donovan X. Ramsey, When Crack Was King: A People’s History of a Misunderstood Era
One World / Penguin Random House

Cristina Rivera Garza, Liliana’s Invincible Summer: A Sister’s Search for Justice
Hogarth / Penguin Random House

Christina Sharpe, Ordinary Notes
Farrar, Straus and Giroux / Macmillan Publishers

Raja Shehadeh, We Could Have Been Friends, My Father and I: A Palestinian Memoir
Other Press

John Vaillant, Fire Weather: A True Story from a Hotter World
Knopf / Penguin Random House

Kidada E. Williams, I Saw Death Coming: A History of Terror and Survival in the War Against Reconstruction
Bloomsbury Publishing

2023 National Book Awards Longlist for Poetry

The ten contenders for the National Book Award for Poetry

Find The New Yorker’s announcement here. 

The National Book Foundation announced the Longlist for the 2023 National Book Award for Poetry. The Finalists in all five categories will be revealed on Tuesday, October 3.

The 2023 Poetry Longlist includes poets in all stages of their publishing careers. Only one honoree on the Poetry Longlist has been previously honored by the National Book Awards: Monica Youn was a Finalist for Poetry in 2010 and a Longlister for Poetry in 2016. This year’s Poetry Longlist includes a Guggenheim Fellow and three National Endowment for the Arts Fellows. The poets have been recognized by the American Book Award, the Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, the Kate Tufts Discovery Award, the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry, the Lannan Literary Award, the Pushcart Prizes, the William Carlos Williams Award, and more. Three of the books come from university presses and six come from independent publishers, including one publisher that is appearing on the National Book Award Longlists for the first time: the University of Georgia Press.

Monica Youn offers a piercing examination of America’s obsession with what it considers “other” in her latest collection, From From. Through poetry and personal essays, Youn manipulates technique and subject—from Dr. Seuss’s political cartoons and Proust to the television show Fresh Off the Boat and Greek mythology—to confront American racism and anti-Asian violence and reflect back the question of “where are you from from” onto its readers. Paisley Rekdal, too, confronts anti-Asian sentiments and the Asian experience in the US—primarily from a historical perspective. West: A Translation is a hybrid collection of poems and lyric essays inspired by an anonymous carving at a detention center in San Francisco eulogizing a Chinese migrant who died there by suicide. Informed by historical artifacts and her own family’s history, Rekdal presents a translation of the anonymous poem followed by “notes” that contextualize the completion of the first transcontinental railroad, built during the Chinese Exclusion Act.

Three works offer meditations on the possibilities of individual and collective survival, while also confronting the precarity of the modern world. Annelyse Gelman’s book-length poem Vexations—titled and structured after Erik Satie’s 19th-century piano score of the same name—follows a mother and daughter traveling through a dystopian world where the contagion at hand affects human empathy. Vexations embodies both speculative fiction and call-to-action across a sonic, cinematic soundscape. In Trace Evidence, Charif Shanahan examines his queer, mixed-race identity and the legacies of anti-Blackness and colonialism in the US and abroad. At the core of Shanahan’s collection is a poem about a catastrophic bus accident he survived during a trip to his mother’s native Morocco. Across three distinct sections, Shanahan contends with erasure, mortality, and against all odds, living. Evie Shockley plays with visuals, sounds, and poetic form to pay homage to Black feminist visionaries, both living and departed in her collection suddenly we. Shockley asks readers to envision a more balanced relationship between inner self and outer community, and ultimately, a more expansive definition of the collective “we.”

In two collections, new paths are forged and ancestral ways are preserved, demonstrating poetry’s ability to transcend any one time or medium. from unincorporated territory [åmot] is the fifth collection in Craig Santos Perez’s ongoing series dedicated to the history of his homeland and the culture of the indigenous Chamoru people from the western Pacific island of Guåhan (Guam). Through experimental poems, Perez observes and asserts storytelling as an act of resistance—a written form of “åmot,” the Chamoru word for “medicine”—that champions decolonization, demilitarization, and environmental justice. John Lee Clark’s How to Communicate considers the small joys and pains of life, and the endless possibilities of language through poems influenced by the Braille slate and translated from American Sign Language and Protactile, a language used by DeafBlind people that’s rooted in touch. The result is an inventive and human exploration on the power of tactility and of poetry.

Several collections on this year’s Longlist consider migration to and in the United States and explore the inherent complexities—and joys—of diasporic identity. In The Diaspora Sonnets, Oliver de la Paz chronicles his family’s search for a home in the US after leaving the Philippines in 1972. The reader travels from coast to coast alongside de la Paz’s uprooted family, as the sonnets themselves become homes for belonging, longing, and displacement. Promises of Gold positions love—cultural, familial, platonic, and for one’s self—as a hopeful and healing anecdote to intergenerational trauma. José Olivarez reflects on his experience as the son of Mexican immigrants and the slipperiness of the American Dream in this collection, which includes a complete translation from the original English into Spanish by poet David Ruano González. Tripas celebrates Brandon Som’s upbringing in a multicultural, multigenerational home—honoring his Chinese American father who ran the family corner store and his Mexican Nana who worked on the assembly line at Motorola. Som’s poems traverse languages, cultures, and borders, connecting his family histories and heritages in a conversation about migration, labor, and memory.

Publishers submitted a total of 295 books for the 2023 National Book Award for Poetry. The judges for Poetry are Rick Barot, Heid E. Erdrich (Chair), Jonathan Farmer, Raina J. León, and Solmaz Sharif. Judges’ decisions are made independently of the National Book Foundation staff and Board of Directors, and deliberations are strictly confidential. Winners in all categories will be announced live at the National Book Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, November 15, 2023.

2023 Longlist for the National Book Award for Poetry:

John Lee Clark, How to Communicate
W. W. Norton & Company

Oliver de la Paz, The Diaspora Sonnets
Liveright / W. W. Norton & Company

Annelyse Gelman, Vexations
University of Chicago Press

José Olivarez, Promises of Gold
Henry Holt and Company / Macmillan Publishers

Craig Santos Perez, from unincorporated territory [åmot]
Omnidawn Publishing

Paisley Rekdal, West: A Translation
Copper Canyon Press

Brandon Som, Tripas
Georgia Review Books / University of Georgia Press

Charif Shanahan, Trace Evidence
Tin House Books

Evie Shockley, suddenly we
Wesleyan University Press

Monica Youn, From From
Graywolf Press

2023 National Book Awards Longlist for Translated Literature

The ten contenders for the National Book Award for Translated Literature

Find The New Yorker’s announcement here.

The National Book Foundation announced the Longlist for the 2023 National Book Award for Translated Literature. The Finalists in all five categories will be revealed on Tuesday, October 3.

The ten titles on this year’s Translated Literature Longlist were originally published in seven different languages: Arabic, Dutch, French, German, Korean, Portuguese, and Spanish. Six honorees have previously been recognized as Longlisters or Finalists for the National Book Award for Translated Literature. Khaled Khalifa and Leri Price were Finalists in 2019 for Death Is Hard Work, and Price was a Finalist again in 2021 for Samar Yzabek’s Planet of Clay; Fernanda Melchor and Sophie Hughes were Longlisted in 2020 for Hurricane Season; and Pilar Quintana and Lisa Dillman were Finalists in 2020 for The Bitch. The authors and translators on the list have been recognized by numerous international prizes, including the Thornton Wilder Prize for Translation, the Biblioteca de Narrativa Prize, the Goncourt Prize, the International Booker Prize, the Otras Voces Otros Ámbitos Prize, the P.C. Hooft Prize, the PEN Translation Prize, and the Saif Ghobash Banipal Prize for Arabic Literary Translation.

Three of this year’s Longlisted titles blur the line between fiction and reality, questioning where art and creator begin and end. After a famous French botanist dies in the early 1800s, his daughter discovers his unpublished memoir, which reveals his hidden past chasing the story of Maram—a young noblewoman who escaped slavery in West Africa. Beyond the Door of No Return by David Diop, translated from the French by Sam Taylor and inspired by Senegal’s oral traditions, contemplates the brutality of French colonial occupation and the consequences of obsession, love, and betrayal. The Most Secret Memory of Men follows a different quest—a Paris-based Senegalese novelist enamored with a literary mystery: the disappearance of the “Black Rimbaud.” In Mohamed Mbougar Sarr’s novel, translated from the French by Lara Vergnaud, the narrator eventually tracks down the reclusive author—based on real-life Malian writer Yambo Ouloguem—and seeks to bring his long-lost novel to a new generation of readers. Mysteries continue for the unnamed narrator in The Devil of the Provinces who returns to his native Colombia after 15 years abroad, only to find himself entangled in his brother’s unsolved murder while substitute teaching at a boarding school where girls give birth to peculiar creatures. As everything unravels in this novel by Juan Cárdenas and translated from the Spanish by Lizzie Davis, the protagonist has to accept that he may be destined to spend the rest of his days in the city he thought he’d left behind for good and with no clear answers in sight.

In Abyss by Pilar Quintana, 8-year-old narrator Claudia makes sense of the world through observing the adults around her: a beloved tía, a dependable yet taciturn father, and a depressed mother obsessed with reading celebrity gossip and relaying tales of famous suicides. When a new family member’s arrival threatens to upend the family’s precarious dynamic, Claudia calls upon the fantastical to reconcile confusing scenes she witnesses with the reality she thought she knew. Set in Cali, Colombia, and translated from the Spanish by Lisa Dillman, the novel shows readers that children are sometimes the most capable of knowing and perceiving the complexities of living.

Two story collections consider how acts of violence can shape individuals and entire societies. A collection of stories each based on true events, This Is Not Miami by Fernanda Melchor delves into the minds and motivations of killers and misfits, inviting the reader to think twice before classifying them as monsters. Translated from Spanish by Sophie Hughes and set in and around Veracruz, Mexico, these stories are as much about communities in crisis as they are about how everyday people learn to cope when horrifying acts of violence become commonplace. Translated from the Korean by Anton Hur, the ten stories in Cursed Bunny dive headfirst into the surreal—a pregnant woman is forced to identify the father of her unborn child or face unspeakable consequences, another woman’s bodily waste comes back to haunt her, and in another story a cursed lamp brings misfortune to anyone who touches it. Bora Chung blends genre and form to tackle the very real horrors of big tech, capitalism, and the patriarchy.

Two novels set in South America focus on the interior lives of queer narrators at the margins of society. In Stênio Gardel’s The Words That Remain, Raimundo, now in his seventies, is finally able to read a letter from his childhood friend and lover, Cícero, which resurfaces intense memories—of his first love, his illiterate upbringing in an impoverished area of Northern Brazil, and the life he created for himself after leaving. Translated from the Portuguese by Bruna Dantas Lobato, this debut novel is an exploration of queer desire, violence and shame, and the transformative power of the written word. In Astrid Roemer’s On A Woman’s Madness, translated from the Dutch by Lucy Scott, Noenka, a queer Black woman, escapes her hometown and her abusive husband just nine days after their wedding. Determined to live a life of her choosing in the capital of Suriname, Noenka seeks a new framework for romance after she falls in love with an older woman and attempts to live a life made nearly impossible by society’s worst patriarchal and colonial impulses.

Characters chase personal freedom as their worlds collapse in two Longlisted novels. In No One Prayed Over Their Graves, friends Hanna and Zakariya find their lives upended when a flood destroys their homes and places of worship—one Christian and one Muslim—in their Syrian village, killing nearly all of their neighbors and family members. This novel follows the men as they reimagine their lives after tragedy in this testament to faith, place, and the meaning of home, written by Khaled Khalifa and translated from the Arabic by Leri Price. Kairos by Jenny Erpenbeck tells the story of a tumultuous romance that begins in East Berlin during the 1980s when 19-year-old Katharina begins an affair with Hans, a writer in his 50s. Set against the backdrop of the declining German Democratic Republic, and translated from the German by Michael Hofmann, the novel demonstrates the parallels between personal and political identities and explores the tensions between pleasure and pain, submission and domination, and East and West.

Publishers submitted a total of 154 books for the 2023 National Book Award for Translated Literature. The judges for Translated Literature are Geoffrey Brock, Arthur Malcolm Dixon, Cristina Rodriguez, T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting, and Jeremy Tiang (Chair). Judges’ decisions are made independently of the National Book Foundation staff and Board of Directors, and deliberations are strictly confidential. Winners in all categories will be announced live at the National Book Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, November 15.

2023 Longlist for the National Book Award for Translated Literature:

Juan Cárdenas, The Devil of the Provinces
Translated from the Spanish by Lizzie Davis
Coffee House Press

Bora Chung, Cursed Bunny
Translated from the Korean by Anton Hur
Algonquin Books / Hachette Book Group

David Diop, Beyond the Door of No Return
Translated from the French by Sam Taylor
Farrar, Straus and Giroux / Macmillan Publishers

Jenny Erpenbeck, Kairos
Translated from the German by Michael Hofmann
New Directions Publishing

Stênio Gardel, The Words That Remain
Translated from the Portuguese by Bruna Dantas Lobato
New Vessel Press

Khaled Khalifa, No One Prayed Over Their Graves
Translated from the Arabic by Leri Price
Farrar, Straus and Giroux / Macmillan Publishers

Fernanda Melchor, This Is Not Miami
Translated from the Spanish by Sophie Hughes
New Directions Publishing

Pilar Quintana, Abyss
Translated from the Spanish by Lisa Dillman
World Editions

Astrid Roemer, On a Woman’s Madness
Translated from the Dutch by Lucy Scott
Two Lines Press

Mohamed Mbougar Sarr, The Most Secret Memory of Men
Translated from the French by Lara Vergnaud
Other Press

2023 National Book Awards Longlist for Young People’s Literature

The ten contenders for the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature

Find The New Yorker’s announcement here.

The National Book Foundation announced the Longlist for the 2023 National Book Award for Young People’s Literature (YPL). The Finalists in all five categories will be revealed on Tuesday, October 3.

This year’s Longlist is composed of 11 newcomers to the National Book Awards. The ten titles highlight three works of nonfiction—including a graphic memoir; and seven works of fiction—including a picture book and two graphic novels. Authors appearing on this list have been honored by the Caldecott Medal, the Middle East Book Award, and the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work – Children, among others.

Through moving prose and captivating illustrations, the titles on the 2023 YPL Longlist center characters coming of age from a diversity of perspectives and identities. These books trace family histories, re-frame historical and scientific events, and are placed in settings from 1930s Ukraine to a small town in present-day Pennsylvania—and even in a fictional town called the National Quiet Zone.

Three titles—Huda F Cares?, A First Time for Everything, and Parachute Kids—are all written and illustrated by their authors and center vacations that take unexpected turns. During her family’s road trip from Dearborn, Michigan to Orlando, Florida, Huda can’t help but feel self-conscious when it seems like all eyes are on her visibly Muslim family during rest stops, prayer time, and at Disney World. Huda Fahmy’s graphic novel Huda F Cares? is a story about self-acceptance, proudly practicing your faith, and the joys and embarrassments of sisterhood. Dan Santat captures the awkward middle school experience in A First Time for Everything, a graphic memoir inspired by his travels through France, Germany, Switzerland, and England. In this graphic memoir, readers learn that Dan is a good kid who is used to being made fun of, which is why he’s not particularly eager to go on a class trip to Europe. Much to his surprise, in that same trip, Dan experiences a series of life-changing firsts—his first sip of Fanta, first time listening to French rap, first time getting lost in a foreign country, and first time falling in love. In Parachute Kids, Feng-Li and her two siblings are excited to visit the United States for the first time, but at the end of their monthlong vacation they find out that their parents plan to return to Taiwan, leaving the siblings in California with family friends. In this graphic novel by Betty C. Tang, the siblings learn to live with each other as they navigate racist bullies, grasp a new language, and are thrust headfirst into American culture.

Three titles on this year’s Longlist illuminate the complexity of historical and scientific events to help readers make sense of them. Hidden Systems: Water, Electricity, the Internet, and the Secrets Behind the Systems We Use Every Day, thoughtfully highlights how some of the most intricate structures that keep our society moving—like water, the electrical grid, and the internet—came to be. Complete with graphs, maps, and diagrams, this nonfiction graphic novel written and illustrated by Dan Nott explores hidden systems’ impacts on the environment, the structural inequities they magnify, and the changes we must all embrace now in order to improve our future. More Than a Dream: The Radical March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom takes readers on a journey that looks beyond Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s iconic “I Have a Dream” speech to explore the March on Washington’s often overlooked radical roots. Using photos and reports from Black newspapers, Yohuru Williams and Michael G. Long focus on the role of Black women activists who made the protest possible and connect the demands for jobs and freedom from six decades ago to today’s continued fight for economic and racial justice. The Lost Year interrogates a chapter of Ukrainian history, following 13-year-old Matthew as he uncovers a family secret tracing back to Holodomor, a government-imposed famine that led to the death of millions of Ukrainians. Katherine Marsh guides the reader through alternating timelines that link three cousins through 1930s Ukraine, 1930s Brooklyn, and present-day New Jersey to weave together a story about survivor’s guilt, sacrifice, and resistance.

Two Longlisted titles follow protagonists looking for hope and community amidst traumatic events. In Gather by Kenneth M. Cadow, Ian Gray fights to maintain his family’s home, find a job, and care for his mother as she recovers from her opioid addiction—all the while adopting Gather, a stray dog he isn’t supposed to have. Cadow’s debut novel is a coming-of-age story based in rural Vermont about the importance of resiliency, survival, and companionship. In Simon Sort of Says, when Simon O’Keeffe becomes the only survivor of a school shooting, he and his family move to a town in the United States where the internet, and all electronic devices, are banned: the National Quiet Zone. Erin Bow’s novel is a tribute to the power of friendship and the courage it takes to pursue joy in a world of violence.

In Alyson Derrick’s solo authorial debut, Stevie loses her memory after a devastating fall, erasing the past two years of her life: her plans to escape her conservative hometown, coming to terms with her queer identity, and even her girlfriend, Nora. Forget Me Not explores the inevitability of fate and the significance of having to choose the one you love all over again. Self-love is at the heart of Big, a picture book written and illustrated by Vashti Harrison. Big is the story of a little girl with a big heart and big dreams who—on the playground and in ballet class—learns that “big” doesn’t always have a positive connotation. Harrison deftly addresses the adultification of Black girls and anti-fatness, while offering readers an important reminder that words matter and that it’s okay for bodies to take up space.

Publishers submitted a total of 348 books for the 2023 National Book Award for Young People’s Literature. The judges for Young People’s Literature are Sarah Park Dahlen, Kyle Lukoff, Claudette S. McLinn (Chair), justin a. reynolds, and Sabaa Tahir. Judges’ decisions are made independently of the National Book Foundation staff and Board of Directors, and deliberations are strictly confidential. Winners in all categories will be announced live at the National Book Awards Ceremony on Wednesday, November 15, 2023.

2023 Longlist for the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature:

Erin Bow, Simon Sort of Says
Disney-Hyperion Books / Disney Publishing Worldwide

Kenneth M. Cadow, Gather
Candlewick Press 

Alyson Derrick, Forget Me Not
Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers / Simon & Schuster

Huda Fahmy, Huda F Cares?
Dial Books for Young Readers / Penguin Random House

Vashti Harrison, Big
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers / Hachette Book Group 

Katherine Marsh, The Lost Year: A Survival Story of the Ukrainian Famine
Roaring Brook Press / Macmillan Publishers

Dan Nott, Hidden Systems: Water, Electricity, the Internet, and the Secrets Behind the Systems We Use Every Day
Random House Graphic / Penguin Random House

Dan Santat, A First Time for Everything
First Second / Macmillan Publishers

Betty C. Tang, Parachute Kids
Graphix / Scholastic, Inc.

Yohuru Williams and Michael G. Long, More Than a Dream: The Radical March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom
Farrar, Straus and Giroux Books for Young Readers / Macmillan Publishers