Alice Kaplan

Alice Kaplan is the author of Reproductions of Banality: Fascism, Literature, and French Intellectual Life (1986); French Lessons: A Memoir (1993); and The Collaborator: The Trial and Execution of Robert Brasillach (2000), which won the Los Angeles Times Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Alice Kaplan is the author of Reproductions of Banality: Fascism, Literature, and French Intellectual Life (1986); French Lessons: A Memoir (1993); and The Collaborator: The Trial and Execution of Robert Brasillach (2000), which won the Los Angeles Times Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her book, The Interpreter, was published in 2005.

Deirdre McNamer

Deirdre McNamer is the author of the novels Rima in the Weeds (1991), One Sweet Quarrel (1994), My Russian (1999), andRed Rover (2007), which was named a Best Book of 2007 by Artforum, The Washington Post, and the Los Angeles Times

Deirdre McNamer is the author of the novels Rima in the Weeds (1991), One Sweet Quarrel (1994), My Russian (1999), andRed Rover (2007), which was named a Best Book of 2007 by Artforum, The Washington Post, and the Los Angeles Times.  Her stories and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, Ploughshares, Doubletake, and elsewhere.

Gary D. Schmidt

Gary D. Schmidt is a Professor of English at Calvin College, where he teaches courses in writing, medieval literature, and children’s literature. He is the author of the Newbery Honor and Printz Honor-winning novel Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy (2004), the Newbery Honor- winning The Wednesday Wars (2007), and Okay for Now, a National Book Award finalist in 2011.

Gary D. Schmidt is a Professor of English at Calvin College, where he teaches courses in writing, medieval literature, and children’s literature. He is the author of the Newbery Honor and Printz Honor-winning novel Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy (2004), the Newbery Honor- winning The Wednesday Wars (2007), and Okay for Now, a National Book Award finalist in 2011. He lives on a two-hundred-year-old farm in Alto, Michigan.

William Alexander

William Alexander won the National Book Award in 2012 for his first novel, Goblin Secrets. His second novel, Ghoulish Song, was a finalist for the Mythopoeic Award. His third, Ambassador, was a finalist for the International Latino Book Award and won the Eleanor Cameron Award. Will studied theater and folklore at Oberlin College, English at the University of Vermont, and creative writing at Clarion. He teaches at the Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Laura Kasischke

Laura Kasischke is a poet and novelist whose fiction has been made into several feature-length films. Her book of poems, Space, in Chains, won the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Laura Kasischke is a poet and novelist whose fiction has been made into several feature-length films. Her book of poems, Space, in Chains, won the National Book Critics Circle Award. She currently teaches at the University of Michigan and lives in Chelsea, Michigan.

Tim Seibles

Tim Seibles is the author of five collections of poetry, including Fast Animal, which won the Theodore Roethke Memorial Poetry Prize and was a 2012 National Book Award Poetry Finalist. His honors include an Open Voice Award and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center. He teaches at Old Dominion University, and has taught at the University of Southern Maine’s Stonecoast MFA program and at Cave Canem.

Lorrie Moore

Lorrie Moore is the author of three story collections and three novels, the most recent being A Gate at the Stairs (2009), a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Orange Prize. Her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in The New YorkerThe New York Review of BooksThe New York TimesThe Paris ReviewThe Yale Review, and elsewhere.

Lorrie Moore is the author of three story collections and three novels, the most recent being A Gate at the Stairs (2009), a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Orange Prize. Her fiction and nonfiction have appeared in The New YorkerThe New York Review of BooksThe New York TimesThe Paris ReviewThe Yale Review, and elsewhere. She has been the recipient of the Irish Times Prize for International Fiction, the Rea Award for the Short Story, the PEN/Malamud Award, the O. Henry Award, and a Lannan fellowship. She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and currently teaches at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Dinaw Mengestu

Dinaw Mengestu is the author of three novels, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears (2007), How to Read the Air (2010), and All Our Names (2015).

Dinaw Mengestu is the author of three novels, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears (2007), How to Read the Air (2010), and All Our Names (2015). He is a graduate of Georgetown University and of Columbia University’s MFA program in Fiction, a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 Honoree, and a New Yorker 20 Under 40 selection. His journalism and fiction have appeared in such publications as Harper’s, Granta, Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, and The Wall Street Journal. In 2012, he received a 2012 MacArthur Foundation Fellowship. He lives in New York City.